This is not the TOUR I know.

NOTE: I have tried to be overwhelmingly positive in the way I share my heart. Today may come across differently, and if you don’t want that, then I suggest you click the X at the top left of your page.

EDIT: Since there are some that respnding to my comment about a wife being heckled for her beauty, I was not talking about myself. Continue the insults, but at least know that. 

“I mean the goal from the minute we got out here was to just crush them as bad as we can and, um, I hope that we close them out today and we go out tomorrow and just beat ’em even worse.” -Daniel Berger

Last week was hard on my heart. That video right there pretty much sums up why. The fans felt the same way. I wonder why when that’s what they witnessed…

I am an American through and through. I love my country with all my heart and know that I am one of the lucky to live here. I am also a child of immigrants. Both of my parents grew up in the Philippines. My paternal grandfather was American and passed along citizenship to my father, and my mother is a naturalized citizen. My father’s 23-year service in the US Navy brought and kept us in the good ole’ USA.  I am an American that was raised with Spanish and Filipino cultures that have shaped my values. I am married to an Australian green card holder. This has brought a beautiful aspect to my life. One that has blessed me with humor, koalas, and vanilla slice. My children have the incredible benefit of being raised in a family of so many cultures. It’s a beautiful thing.

There were many times last week that I thought about what the kids were seeing. The crowds booing for good shots and cheering for missed putts.  The drinking at 7am? Screaming “Big Easy” to Ernie Els and begging for his autograph and then yelling at his players. Heckling a wife for her beauty and then her husband for his play. I was thankful my boys weren’t there to see the way people were treating their daddy. Their hero. My parents could simply turn the television off.

Adam Hadwin teeing off

When I met Marc, I did not know a birdie from a bogey. I didn’t know anything about any sports really. My head has been stuck in a book for much of my life (there is a reason Belle is my favorite Disney princess,) and I’ve been happy that way. If you had asked me to attend the Masters, I would have asked you what that was with all seriousness. But over the years I have truly come to appreciate this game. I enjoy that true golf lovers want to watch good sport, even if it’s not coming from their favorite players. It’s common to find applause for bogey putts at normal events. The players politely put up their hand in acknowledgment no matter how frustrated they are. Of course, there are times when the game gets the better of them, and clubs end up broken or in the water, but that is not the norm. In fact, it is so frowned upon that players will be fined by the PGA TOUR for poor behavior. They hold their players to a high standard. They recognize the role models the players should be to their young fans.

And I love my TOUR family. They have been there for my family during the worst time of our lives. Their support didn’t stop when I got out of the hospital. I found it in little ways for several months after. Someone holding the door open for me when I was probably just a little farther away than they would have been expected to wait. The fact that when people asked me how I was doing, they truly wanted to know the answer. The way they have shared in our joy. How they truly understood the miracle that Eva is and how they have celebrated with us.


Golf is truly a gentleman’s sport. But last week was not the golf I know. During the opening ceremony, I was enjoying the Fanatics singing their songs that most people have come to love when I heard an American scream, “Speak English!”

1.  What an awful and ignorant thing to say.

2. They were speaking English.

3. Half of the International Team is bilingual. How many languages do you speak?

The rest of the week didn’t get much better nor did the insults. Someone yelled “Blooming Onion!” to Marc. Check yourself and your facts because that’s not Australian in the least. Another yelled, “avocado!” at him. I feel sorry for you because if you don’t understand how delicious an avocado is, then you are living a sad, sad life. “You eat cereal with a fork!” Oh friend, maybe that’s actually you who does that, because how would you even think to say that? I understand that this was not every fan. In fact, I believe that most of the people acting that way were not actually golf fans. Unfortunately, that doesn’t change the fact that they were the loudest and that the people around them did not ask them to stop.

By Sunday afternoon when America won, the crowd calmed down some. All of a sudden they liked our guys again. Yelling for autographs and pictures. And what did our guys do? They signed and smiled. When we were waiting on the 14th green for the closing ceremony all of us were distracted and chatting. Captain Price got our attention and asked us to start clapping for the American Team. Because that is what golf is. That is what sportsmanship is. That is why I was so proud to be part of the International Team. You will not find a kinder group of talented men.

I want to be clear about something. I wish for nothing but success for Marc because he works hard for it and it allows us to give back. But whether he wins or loses is of no importance to me. I only care about how he wins and how he loses. I care that he wins with humility and loses with grace. When Marc shot 40 on the back nine to lose the Dell Technologies Championship he did not throw a fit. You could see the disappointment etched on his face as the cameras zoomed in close, but you didn’t see much more than that. Two weeks later he bought beer for the media as thanks to the cameraman who jumped out of the way of his bunker shot. That is what is important to me.


Recently a reporter asked me what motto I live by. My answer:

After the first day, the Internationals were obviously down. I was watching the Golf Channel and heard Brandel Chamblee say, “If you’re Captain Nick Price, what do you do when you’re looking at a massacre?” Well, Mr. Chamblee, after the devastating tragedy in Vegas this week- I want to ask you: Was that kind? Necessary? True? I don’t think it improved upon the silence.

America has had a hard year. Last week was a chance to come together over something so simple, the love of golf. I wish we could have shown our best. With the Statue of Liberty as our backdrop, we certainly should have.

164 thoughts on “This is not the TOUR I know.

  1. First, it certainly _could’ve_ been yourself that you were referencing with the “wife” comment. Obviously. Just ignore the stupidity of others.

    As for the rest, I’m with you one hundred percent. The needs of broadcast TV only feed it. They love the screaming and the “pumpedness” and the drama. They want it right at the edge and don’t mind if it goes over. I’ve been in the game for four decades, played and taught as a pro, was a plus-2 handicapper as an amateur, etc., and I’ve seen the game get more and more like any other pro sport because of the Tour’s need, and the media’s need, for unceasingly more money and bigger markets.

    This game is not supposed to be like pro basketball or pro football. This shouldn’t be a sport where the biggest star — or anybody — is making “mistakes” (over and over, for years) with every cocktail waitress and aspiring porn star he can get his hands on, refuses to sign a golf ball for charity, can’t be bothered to curb his profanity on camera when he knows kids are watching, etc., and a big percentage of his fans make excuses for him the same way people made excuses for Kobe and Roethlisberger and McGwire. Even the USGA bent for him after the Masters tournament committee screwed up on a rules call. The game is supposed to be bigger than you, but not when you’re a megacelebrity and money and TV ratings are at stake. Then you’ve got another star with the cocaine and the sleeping with tour wives (and the criminal past that gets the usual “it was adversity” treatment), and whatever, and both fans and the media act like we ought to find him more interesting because of it. Lovable-rogue kinda thing, I guess. Then there are players who are “interesting” and get camera time for getting all jacked during team competitions and encouraging the “it’s a war” mentality with the fans.

    I’m not talking about most of the guys, of course, and of course you were talking only about the fans, and only _some_ fans, not the state of whole game. I’m just saying that kind of behavior happens in part because of the context that now surrounds the game. What you see in other aspects of the game is the same dynamic that drives this jacked-up-fans problem — the need for TV-hyped drama that rewards extreme behavior and some of the same kinds of self-absorption and self-focus you see in other sports. It’s just totally against the character of this game. You end up with fans who think they’re at a hockey game. Worse at the team events, but still beer-soaked and “look at me” even in the weekly events. Certainly not all, as you were rightly careful to say, but too many.

    What you see too often at the pro level is that most of the players are just decent guys trying to make a living and move up the ladder in an environment that every year is set up more and more to mimic the TV-driven hyped drama of other sports, and some fans and sportswriters acting like they’re not interesting enough if they’re not “edgy” or demonstrative enough or bad-boy enough. There’s something sick about mass culture that infantilizes people. I don’t mean it forces them to be that way. It’s their choice. It’s just that mass culture driven by ratings and money rewards people who want to act that way anyway and fails to reward adult behavior, because adults are too “boring.” Which is exactly why golf shouldn’t be controlled by mass culture. It should be an alternative to it. But too often it’s not.

    I just hope there are corners out there where parents still teach their kids what the game ought to be. It still matters to some of us. I’d like to think there could be a redevelopment or reawakening of the ethic that ought to be there among people involved in the game, including fans. I’d love to be optimistic about that.

    Anyway…best of luck to you and Mark. He’s a helluva player, and it turns out he’s got a helluva wife. Good for both of you.

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    • I love what you said and the way you said it. Not everyone in the USA is so disrespectful and crass. Just want to speak up for what I think are the vast majority of golfing fans who just flat out enjoy great golf and understand full well that while there might be an ocean separating Australia and the USA our hearts share the same wiring. Some of us short circuited that wiring years ago and have doubled down on hate and contempt. I am ashamed of their behavior.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Emmcaity, as a Walking Scorer volunteer I have had the pleasure of walking with Phil & Tiger who you dogged. Tiger was a total 100% gentleman for the 4 hour round, was thankful & happily autographed my shirt while laughing with me about a bad break on 17 (his ball was lodged in a tree). Phil, everybody’s “hero” on the other hand remains the only player who would not autograph for me or the 2 kids walking as standard bearers. So save your sorry comments.

      As for Audrey & Marc, as I stated previously, they were victims of people who do not understand that golf stands alone in sportsmanship & honesty. Foreign born players are generally the most gracious & appreciative of all players & certainly deserve the utmost respect. And again, the Aussies who I’ve met volunteering – Jason, Adam, the Shark, Badds – have been the nicest.

      I truly wish Audrey & Marc the best for their whole family.

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  2. So… now that you have had your moment of lecturing… did you ask yourself if it was necessary and improved on the silence? Unfortunately, your diatribe was not necessary. While I am sure it is unintended, it sounds like sour grapes, hence, it did not improve on the silence. I like that you feel Marc should win with humility and lose with grace, but why do you not hold yourself to that standard.

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    • She was just telling the truth. Too many Americans are just fat, loud, brash and ignorant. You want proof, watch the Presidents Cup or the Ryder Cup. You don’t see that sort of behaviour from golf fans anywhere else in the world.

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    • What a miserable response you make to this woman who has legitimate concerns. I was at the Ryder Cup last fall and watched the and heard the inebriated crowd – that was mid morning and there were drunks throughout the course – act like they were at a hockey game, not an international golf match. The drunken behavior that we see and hear more and more at US held golf tournaments is deplorable. Cut off the liquor and behavior will likely improve. The disgusting behavior from those who pay a few bucks to enter a venue and then act like they are at a poker game with the boys is too common in this country and should be curtailed. Some of the worst at the Ryder Cup were removed last fall, but not enough of them.

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    • Dickhead comment Navarro…you’ve shown yourself to be a lowlife the sort that Audrey Leishman was aiming her comments at. Well done for confirming your idiocy.

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    • Because it needs to be said, Terry. I’m a Canadian and when I travel to Europe I make sure I have a Cdn flag somewhere on my person. I’m proud of my country but, more so, I don’t want anyone taking me for an American. There are many great Americans but, for the most part, your people are provincial minded and, if you live in the New York area, you take pride in being direct and boorish. When I hear the “USA, USA!!!” chant I’m reminded of the ‘greater-than-thou’ mantra you seem to subscribe to.

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    • I enjoy the Ryder Cup and Presidents Cup and the competition between the countries involved. What I don’t like is the type of boorish unsportsmanlike behaviour that some spectators exhibit at these events. It has nothing to do with who won and lost. Audrey Leishman was simply making an observation and verbalized what many of us have witnessed over the last decade. As a New Zealander looking on and hence fairly neutral on what the outcome is, I cringe at what I have heard and seen from so-called golf fans who would be better off watching a football game. We don’t need this coarse behaviour in golf. By all means, support your team but do so with decorum and dignity. Don’t shoot the messenger for telling it as it is – some of you who have criticized AL need to look in the mirror and honestly ask yourselves whether you really are true followers of the game of golf.

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  3. As an American, I am sorry you had to endure this atmosphere….I hope you know all Americans are not like this and hope that you can forgive the “hooligans” in the New York crowd.

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  4. As an ex Golf Professional and die hard American, Mrs. Leishman is exactly right…we have gone way over the line…I apologize for our clueless American fan base who don’t seem to know when to shut it..,

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    • I love how everyone here has to qualify their response “as an ex pro” or “I was at the Ryder Cup when…” or “I know Marc” Just shut up. No one cares.

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      • Joe Schmo, we don’t care for your opinion…it’s come straight out of your fat backside. Time for you to shut it and get back in your box.

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  5. Brandel’s comments were made 4 days before the Las Vegas shooting.. You lose me when you start taking things out of context and overdramatizing. Please do not take the actions of a few morons and label our entire country.

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    • I also agree that it’s time the respectable fans speak up and shut this morons up, this is no place for this and most of all a very bad influence on our children, not what golf is supposed to be about

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  6. As a golfer and a golf fan, I think her statement was excellent. Golf is not a sport like any other. The players are held to a higher standard. The fans here and abroad (at the Ryder Cup) have been obnoxious. Over there, stepping on a player’s golf ball, here, acting like they’re at a Tyson fight. Thankfully it is a few, sadly, it is allowed. Best wishes to Marc and Audrey

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  7. Well thought out and well written comments; and so accurate – golf has morphed away from it roots, to its detriment. The spirit of these competitions – President’s Cup, Ryder Cup – was designed to be a “friendly”. Not some no-holds-barred, duel-to-the-death match! American fans (and yes I am American) have gone astray. I agree with you that the vast majority of problem makers are likely not golf fans. And for that the game can be thankful.
    Once more, kudos for a brave, intelligent piece of writing.

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  8. Game of Kings.
    Too bad like most things these days, we tolerate the ignorant instead of attempting to teach them. We call it out immediately when we’re playing, it’s awkward, but to cop a great quote, “manners maketh the man”. Sometimes those tough conversations ignite the maturity hidden inside.. We try to do it by example, but there has the be an intrinsic awareness of self, and desire for improvement… that’s lost on many in the stands.
    Oh, and yeah, alcohol…. all day long…
    Another inalienable right? Ha
    Was anyone ashamed? Didn’t see it.

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  9. Audrey…you are an absolute joy and a lovely person. Marc… you truly have a gem for a partner!! Aodrey, every single thing you said was correct about the Presidents Cup and the many stupid and boorish American fans. Tons of these guys know nothing about conduct and class!! Drinking, swearing, yelling, being a moron, etc.is why they are there!! What a disgrace!! Getting drunk by 7:00 in the morning and screaming all day at anyone was their agenda! Forget about it, Audrey… enjoy your wonderful family and Marc’s fantastic play recently (wow!!), keep well, and know that your thoughts echo most people who love and follow golf! You, Audrey, are a very classy lady.

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  10. Hey, sorry that you were made to feel the way you do. I’m hoping that ALL of the Americans weren’t acting badly. I personally thought that all the jeering etc was all in good fun and the golfer of both teams knew that and were good natured about it. However, it’s always all fun until someone gets their feelings hurt. I too love the game of Golf and it’s integrity, yet I don’t pretend to know everything there is to know about all of it and these “contests” like the on last week. It SEEMS TO ME that these contests have American golfers vs “everyone else”…. I’m sure there is rhyme and reason behind this. I say that just as a thought that MAYBE that’s why some get too passionate about it. Still no excuse to be rude or hurtful, of course. Heck, from the few comments I’ve seen on here, it appears that there are those that are basically doing the same thing, while defending/agreeing w/ you, they are bashing “fat Americans etc…..”. Unfortunately, everything is great, until people get involved, if you have people, you have problems. Your favorite husband seems like a fine man and great sport. Hopefully, he and you are able to shrug this off and do great.

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  11. A very well put, reasoned, balanced and in the circumstances and in my opinion, honest article that sadly lays bare the fact that some people in the USA whilst attending this event and god forbid, probably the Ryder cup, are simply morons who I believe are also what is known in the USA as “sports fans” rather than golf fans, the majority hailing from the great country that is America and who in my personal experience are very proud of their country (and quite rightly so) but also fair when it comes down to it.
    There simply is no place for these idiots within this great game and the sooner their fellow spectators tell them exactly that and hopefully also “encourage” them to leave the course the better.
    In addition, stewarding should be at level that if someone transgresses in this brain dead, ignorant and completely unacceptable manner it has the “ejection” consequence.

    Lastly, Mrs Leishman has my entire sympathy with regard to the remarks she was subjected to both in person and from cowardly, inadequate and pathetic “keyboard warriors” and as for Daniel Burger, surely his surname sums this unpleasant apology for a human being up!

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    • Pat, you have included everything I was about to say, so nothing left , only agree wholeheartedly. This behaviour wouldn’t be tolerated in Augusta, where your continued entry is dependant on your behaviour. It wasn’t the case at the recent Walker Cup matches at the LACC, where sportsmanship and friendliness was the order of the day. Well said , Mrs. Leishman, look forward to seeing your husband at the Open Championship next year

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      • Point well made John. All Golf events should expect the level of spectator behavior as demonstrated at Augusta. Those who fall short (a very small number in all likelyhood) should be treated as they are at Augusta, & ejected from the premises. Problem solved!

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  12. Wow, I think your right about rude fans. But Ignore them for they have little to be proud of !!!! Also remember Golf is entertainment nothing more !! This tourney is to make money. So they call it president cup. What does that mean?? Only presidents can play? It’s entertaining to pick a side and root for that team. Your husband is a great actor or you can call him an athlete but we are only paying him to show us how to hit a good shot. He’s does not make our lives better. What does he produce? Food, Medicine, machines or protect us? What does he do again? Oh yea he hits a white ball with a club. Is that all he does? Remember it’s the fans that pay for your house, car, travel hotels food. So thank God every day you have a pretty nice life and the rude fans do not.

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  13. Thank you for taking the time to write your thoughts in such a public forum, knowing that there are certainly people who will disagree. I couldn’t agree more with your thoughts and felt the same thing, especially as a Canadian trying to cheer on the International team. I was fortunate enough to travel to Boston earlier in September to watch the Dell Technologies and could not believe the lack of respect certain people in the crowd showed the players, yelling at them for not walking by the fans or screaming rude things. Those few people ruin it for the rest of us who are there and just want to watch some golf.

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  14. As an American golfer, it’s impossible to watch a PGA event in the States and not be embarrassed by the standard of behavior which has now become acceptable. Television commentators incessantly laud praise on those “great and enthusiastic” New York fans or those “knowledgeable” fans in Ohio or those “spirited” fans in Phoenix. Though the shackles have definitely come off in America of late with crowds of people given the go-ahead to be as vulgar and as hateful as they want, this has been going on for far too long. In the United States, golf may still be a gentleman’s or gentlewoman’s sport but golf events are not and will likely never be again.

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  15. I think the President’s Cup and Ryder Cup are the worst events in golf solely because of the fan behavior. The golf is exciting and excellent, but the fans detract from it. It’s golf. A gentlemen’s game. It should be a friendly competition. Think of Jack Nicklaus conceding Tony Jacklin’s short putt for the halve. It’s not American football or international football. There’s no need for the abuse and boorish behavior towards the players and their families and fans. I am American and assume it’s mostly ugly Americans. It’s too bad. Perhaps there are ugly European/International fans too, but I suspect they are far out numbered by the ugly Americans. The Ryder Cup didn’t get ugly until the Europeans started to win it regularly starting in the mid-80s. Before that, I bet no one cared and suspect it was barely covered on US television. The US losing brought out the ugly Americans in my opinion. I wish they stayed away. I will not attend one of these events due to the behavior of US fans. I hope this attitude doesn’t infect the Walker Cup.

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  16. i am sorry and embarrassed. It is a shame that our coutry is devolving into this and becoming the “ugly America” that so much of the world abhors. I know that your post is not political, but it is any coincidence that the President of the United States conducts himself in this manner? I am quite certain the Mssrs. Clinton Bush and Obama would not suffer such rudeness without comment. However, President Trump uses such language and sets an unseemly example for what is acceptable.

    We need to be better. We can be better. We should be better. Thanks for being a voice for better.

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    • Well said Adam, good points, well made. As you say when the ‘Boss’ shouts his mouth off and acts in a boorish way every Tom, Dick(head) and Harry think it’s fine for them to do likewise.

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    • Adam. You and the vast majority are better, much better. But unfortunately when a few mouthy beefheads barge their way to the front, they are the only ones noticed!

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  17. The problem is not the fans,it is the idiots that get there tickets for free from the companies they work for and are only there to party with there pals. The fans that pay for there ticket out of there own pocket are there to enjoy the players and the game.

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  18. So sorry you had to put up with that. Unexceptionable. Team spirit is one thing but harsh drunk comments are another. I frequent tournaments and what comes out of some adults mouths are uncalled for.

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  19. Superb commentary, Mrs. Leishman, right on! I am a Canadian living in the U.S., and am constantly repulsed by the poor behavior of golf fans at many events (yes, including the over-the-top drinking and rude treatment of many players). It even happens when events are not specifically U.S. vs. the world (witness the Masters)! I couldn’t agree more that this is setting a very poor example for the children. Golf has always been the ultimate gentleman’s game, and if fans don’t understand and respect that, they should stay home and watch on TV, or go to football games. I’m so happy that your husband has enjoyed success this year, and that you and your family are doing well. Thank you for making this statement as an “American”!

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  20. Thank you Audrey for bringing this to a discussion. I have long felt the boorish few make it worse for the rest of us who love all of golf not just the American golfers. Keep it up!

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  21. Well said Audrey. Unfortunately some people commenting above do not agree with your comments and rather than provide constructive comments in reply, they begin to call names and attack personally. Just so unnecessary.

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  22. Audrey, so sorry you and your husband, a fine gentleman and golfer had to witness the behavior of too many Americans. It is unfortunately what a civilization and society in decline looks like. Urged on by a Facebook mentality. Worse to come most likely. It’s very sad.

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  23. Very well said. I would like my grandchildren to take up the sport someday and I hope it returns to its roots. It started as a gentlemen’s sport and hopefully someday return. When I was kid playing it was all about etiquette. What happened?

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    • Many young people today unfortunately were not taught to respect others and to be kind. That’s what has happened. Fortunately, our parents did teach us these values. I don’t know if it’s possible, but, I hope someday things revert back to the way they use to be.

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  24. Sounds like, feelings are hurt. You should be extremely happy that your husband plays pro golf and is doing well. Without it, most likely, you would not have the lifestyle you are living. Saying whether your husband wins or loses is of no importance to you is pretty lame because if he does poorly, he not only loses money, but can lose endorsements, which would mean you would not be attending these little get together for free and all those nice things you have would be no more, unless you have wealth from some other means, like family. Your analysis of this event is overblown and you are pouting because your husband and his team loss. With this type of contest the reaction of the fans, as you witnessed, is not unusual. They boo and cheer depending on which team they are for and it happens in the states and overseas. If they boo at a putt made by an international player, like your husband, they are actually acknowledging that he made a very good putt. Of course there are always a few bad apples in the basket, whether here in the states or overseas. However, for most, it is all in fun and enjoyment watching (all) the players. Develop some thicker skin and be thankful your husband has this gift, which allows you and your family to enjoy the lifestyle and perks you have, which so many others can not.

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    • WallaB . Grow some eyes. The US team was followed by some piss fueled morons. And they didn’t become morons on the day, they’re almost certainly morons all the time!

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  25. You are right to be critical of the fans, and I would agree these were not real Golf fans but entitled white 20 somethings drinking their breakfast. I was at the 2016 Ryder Cup and witnessed nothing but respect from the Golf fans there. Shame on those fans and the USA support team (captains and Co-captains) for not addressing and enforcing behavior standards that respect the game and the players.

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  26. I am always amazed that you allow people to consume any alcoholic drinks at a major golf event and then expect there to be no come backs. Just look at the event in Arizona where the crowd are expected to act like a bunch of savages as players are about to hit their shots on the stadium par 3. STOP SELLING BOOZE AT GOLF TOURNAMENTS.
    A fantastic and brave article from Marc Leishmans wife. Stop having a go at her for telling the truth.

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  27. I have been saying the same thing to my friends for years. It is almost embarrassing to watch the President cup and the Ryder Cup for the same reason. Fans on both side get carried away. Something should be done I believe.

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  28. You have 3 beautiful healthy children, a miracle baby & you have been given a second chance & live in a 9000 square foot house, and you live a life style that is beyond our dreams. BE greatful and don’t bite the hand that feeds you. You are now marked to be a crybaby for not being able to put up with criticism which is now part of being in the public limelight . Take off the rose colored glasses and realize this is what you signed up for to see your husband become successful.

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    • Wow, Melody. You sound jealous. No one signed up for disrespectful fans. No matter how much or little money you have, there’s no excuse for rudeness.And, btw, check your spelling, it’s grateful, not greatful.

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