This is not the TOUR I know.

NOTE: I have tried to be overwhelmingly positive in the way I share my heart. Today may come across differently, and if you don’t want that, then I suggest you click the X at the top left of your page.

EDIT: Since there are some that respnding to my comment about a wife being heckled for her beauty, I was not talking about myself. Continue the insults, but at least know that. 

“I mean the goal from the minute we got out here was to just crush them as bad as we can and, um, I hope that we close them out today and we go out tomorrow and just beat ’em even worse.” -Daniel Berger

Last week was hard on my heart. That video right there pretty much sums up why. The fans felt the same way. I wonder why when that’s what they witnessed…

I am an American through and through. I love my country with all my heart and know that I am one of the lucky to live here. I am also a child of immigrants. Both of my parents grew up in the Philippines. My paternal grandfather was American and passed along citizenship to my father, and my mother is a naturalized citizen. My father’s 23-year service in the US Navy brought and kept us in the good ole’ USA.  I am an American that was raised with Spanish and Filipino cultures that have shaped my values. I am married to an Australian green card holder. This has brought a beautiful aspect to my life. One that has blessed me with humor, koalas, and vanilla slice. My children have the incredible benefit of being raised in a family of so many cultures. It’s a beautiful thing.

There were many times last week that I thought about what the kids were seeing. The crowds booing for good shots and cheering for missed putts.  The drinking at 7am? Screaming “Big Easy” to Ernie Els and begging for his autograph and then yelling at his players. Heckling a wife for her beauty and then her husband for his play. I was thankful my boys weren’t there to see the way people were treating their daddy. Their hero. My parents could simply turn the television off.

Adam Hadwin teeing off

When I met Marc, I did not know a birdie from a bogey. I didn’t know anything about any sports really. My head has been stuck in a book for much of my life (there is a reason Belle is my favorite Disney princess,) and I’ve been happy that way. If you had asked me to attend the Masters, I would have asked you what that was with all seriousness. But over the years I have truly come to appreciate this game. I enjoy that true golf lovers want to watch good sport, even if it’s not coming from their favorite players. It’s common to find applause for bogey putts at normal events. The players politely put up their hand in acknowledgment no matter how frustrated they are. Of course, there are times when the game gets the better of them, and clubs end up broken or in the water, but that is not the norm. In fact, it is so frowned upon that players will be fined by the PGA TOUR for poor behavior. They hold their players to a high standard. They recognize the role models the players should be to their young fans.

And I love my TOUR family. They have been there for my family during the worst time of our lives. Their support didn’t stop when I got out of the hospital. I found it in little ways for several months after. Someone holding the door open for me when I was probably just a little farther away than they would have been expected to wait. The fact that when people asked me how I was doing, they truly wanted to know the answer. The way they have shared in our joy. How they truly understood the miracle that Eva is and how they have celebrated with us.


Golf is truly a gentleman’s sport. But last week was not the golf I know. During the opening ceremony, I was enjoying the Fanatics singing their songs that most people have come to love when I heard an American scream, “Speak English!”

1.  What an awful and ignorant thing to say.

2. They were speaking English.

3. Half of the International Team is bilingual. How many languages do you speak?

The rest of the week didn’t get much better nor did the insults. Someone yelled “Blooming Onion!” to Marc. Check yourself and your facts because that’s not Australian in the least. Another yelled, “avocado!” at him. I feel sorry for you because if you don’t understand how delicious an avocado is, then you are living a sad, sad life. “You eat cereal with a fork!” Oh friend, maybe that’s actually you who does that, because how would you even think to say that? I understand that this was not every fan. In fact, I believe that most of the people acting that way were not actually golf fans. Unfortunately, that doesn’t change the fact that they were the loudest and that the people around them did not ask them to stop.

By Sunday afternoon when America won, the crowd calmed down some. All of a sudden they liked our guys again. Yelling for autographs and pictures. And what did our guys do? They signed and smiled. When we were waiting on the 14th green for the closing ceremony all of us were distracted and chatting. Captain Price got our attention and asked us to start clapping for the American Team. Because that is what golf is. That is what sportsmanship is. That is why I was so proud to be part of the International Team. You will not find a kinder group of talented men.

I want to be clear about something. I wish for nothing but success for Marc because he works hard for it and it allows us to give back. But whether he wins or loses is of no importance to me. I only care about how he wins and how he loses. I care that he wins with humility and loses with grace. When Marc shot 40 on the back nine to lose the Dell Technologies Championship he did not throw a fit. You could see the disappointment etched on his face as the cameras zoomed in close, but you didn’t see much more than that. Two weeks later he bought beer for the media as thanks to the cameraman who jumped out of the way of his bunker shot. That is what is important to me.


Recently a reporter asked me what motto I live by. My answer:

After the first day, the Internationals were obviously down. I was watching the Golf Channel and heard Brandel Chamblee say, “If you’re Captain Nick Price, what do you do when you’re looking at a massacre?” Well, Mr. Chamblee, after the devastating tragedy in Vegas this week- I want to ask you: Was that kind? Necessary? True? I don’t think it improved upon the silence.

America has had a hard year. Last week was a chance to come together over something so simple, the love of golf. I wish we could have shown our best. With the Statue of Liberty as our backdrop, we certainly should have.

174 thoughts on “This is not the TOUR I know.

  1. Great post Audrey ! I consider myself lucky to know you both and can testify to your family’s kindness. I’m sorry to hear that there was any disrespect shown toward the international team. It is truly a gentleman’s game and I wish the fans had more respect for all players involved. Hopefully it was a minority of the spectators, but hold your head high because humanity needs more people like you and Marc. I hope there were many more people sharing positive vibes than not. All the best to you both !!

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    • so you are being critical of the fans that put food on your table? sounds to me like you need what almost everyone under 45 need, thicker skin. when did people start being so offended by every little thing? if you or your husband doesnt appreciate the fans, take your balls, tuck them in and go down under.

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      • James, you are a f****g idiot. You are the epitome of what years ago was referred to as the Ugly American. You are what the football players are protesting about. Grow up and get a life.

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      • James, what a terrible, horrible and clearly uneducated response to an honest, intelligent and heartfelt story, clearly written by a real human being with a love for the sport and a greater love for her family. Not sure if you read it properly or you simply cant read, Audrey is an American! A proud American that married a proud Australian and one of the most humble men on the world stage. Audrey’s story insults nobody, the story simply points out the fact that she was entirely disappointed that a few “American Supporters” were rude, brash and obnoxious and that as an American she was embarrassed. I am sorry for you James! you are the epitome of the “Ugly American” sadly lacking in education. An apology is in order, if you have the courage! … somehow I doubt that.

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      • I bet you are a yank. Your good players may have created the level of tournaments lifted the standards etc., but have failed in the true sportsmanship in other ways. Ask Greg Norman and Bernard Langer. Langer was reported to have said the best way to ignore the bias of American punters is to win and take their money. Calls of “In the hole” and commentators talking about some schools the Yanks went to before the PGA tour leave me with a silents TV while I just watch the Golf. Boring bring on the Euro where they actually talk about golf players and shots…

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      • Shame on you, James that you were never taught respect and decency and good sportsmanship. I hope someday you can figure this out. I have great respect for the International Team, as well as the European teams. After working at the Ryder Cup at Medinah in 2012, I have a deep respect for the kindness of the European team. They always stopped to sign autographs during practice rounds, not just a few, but all of them. Unfortunately, the Americans only would say, “catch me at the 18th hole”. Perhaps, shamefully, this is an example of our current culture. I guess it’s that in someways we feel entitled. Shame on us. Unfortunately those few at the President’s Cup, have made their mark on a sampling of the kind of people we are. Just reading this text from James, he doesn’t even show respect for your comments Audrey. And, he stoops to using gross language to try to undermine your post. Just shows you how deep the disrespect is planted. So sorry Audrey for your sad experience. Just know that there are many Americans who respect you and all the International and European players.

        From a sad and shameful American.

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      • Allengoldberg. You are wrong. Not Vulgar. Yelling “get in the water” or booing good shots and cheering bad ones is not vulgar. It’s called being a fan. God, you people are so easily offended.

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      • Joe: Certainly you are entitled to your opinion sir. However, reports of vulgarity and screaming profanity was what I was referring to…rooting against the opposition does not require either. By the way, the rudeness of our fans and nastiness of the crowd is unnecessary….but if you disagree..that is your right of course.

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    • Dear Audrey, The jingoistic and nonsensical comments made at these team events are by far the worst part about them, but they are nothing new. What is new however is the sportsmanship displayed by the men who play in them, with few exceptions. Not too long ago, in 1969 for example, opposing team members had to be separated for their pugilistic dispositions. It is worth remembering though that at that very event it was Jack Nicklaus’ concession to Tony Jacklin that put the thing right and reminded everyone of what these competitions are really about. Sport is about entertainment but at its best it communicates values. I’ve seen more good from the players in these team events than I’ve seen bad. Rory and Reed at last year’s Ryder Cup for example. Phil’s thumbs up to Justin in 2012. Payne Stewart telling Colin to pick it up at the last hole because of the heckling in 1999. The 2003 Presidents Cup ( Again Jack Nicklaus ) etc etc. With regard to your question to me. You’ve somewhat misquoted what I said and took it out of context, and by attempting to postdate my comment, it seems as if you are trying to turn what was merely an analogy on Thursday night into what would have been a very insensitive comment had it been uttered on Monday night. I, like you no doubt are, am sickened by the mass shooting in Las Vegas, which is yet another horrific reminder of how random and tragically short life can be. Something I know your family needs no such reminding of. When hearing of your recent illness I knew all to well the hollowness and hopelessness your family was enduring and I joined the whole golf world in pulling for your recovery. Not too long ago when I was playing the tour, the Tour Wives association and the Commisioner helped my family deal with nearly losing my wife and losing our child. I still remember Tim Finchem telling me to take all the time I needed before trying to come back. The Tour family is indeed a closeknit and wonderful group of people, made even better by you and Marc and your family. Iyt is those people who you’ll remember many years from now and the slings and arrows of rowdy fans, and even of a particular TV analyst will fade away. I wish you and your family much happiness. Brandel Chamblee

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      • Hi Brandel, Thank you for taking the time to respond here. I, of course, understand that you could not have foreseen the events in Vegas and therefore could not have understood how your comment could come across. Before the event started our team was disheartened to hear your comments asking why we even bother to show up. I’m sure that many people agree with you but until the PGA TOUR decides to cancel the event my question still remains whether those comments are kind, good, necessary? One of the resounding themes of the negative responses to my post is that I need to grow up and grow a thicker skin. From reading many of these comments that is absolutely the truth. I have been attacked plenty. However, what I do not think most people realize is that after 9 years of traveling with Marc on TOUR I have heard many terrible things said and read many awful things written about him, by both the fans and commentators. We have even had someone write to Marc and tell him that our children are not his. I attended the 2013 Presidents Cup and while the fans were not great there, ether, it was not this bad. The Internationals also lost in Korea but if you talk with both teams they were treated with respect by the Korean fans. I did not feel the need to write anything after either of those losses, even though I had already stated this blog by the time of the 2015 event. We had 12 men competing last week and all 12 experienced the same from the fans. I was not alone in my experience. The headlines are reading that I have slammed the fans. I did not name call but I have been called a few. I do not think I slammed them; I maintain that I am asking people to think about how they treat others and to remember that their actions have an impact. Marc and I have already faced the worst and last week was just a blip on what will hopefully be a long career and many more President Cup teams. I will never be able understand why these events cannot be about supporting your team and your country instead of insulting the other. I suppose I am naive but I am happy to stay that way if it means that I continue to try to always be kind first.
        Lastly, I had not heard your story and I am very sorry for the loss your family experienced. As I am only awake because I currently nursing our littlest; I cannot imagine. It is a sad thing that we both had to experience the kindness of our TOUR family for these things but I know we are both grateful for how amazing it is. Again, thank you for reaching out. Audrey Leishman

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      • Brandel, I agree with Audrey, before you say anything think about if your comments are kind, good or necessary.

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      • Brandel, Audrey:

        As a fan we all witness poor behavior and I have personally been heckled by the other teams fans for wearing the jersey of my team in a foreign venue. While this is annoying and disappointing I can assure you that how you handle the heckling with your own behavior will typically win over the other fans. I am certainly sorry for your experience while attending the Presidents cup, however, I disagree with your comments scolding Daniel Berger and Mr Chamblee about using the word “massacre”. They both used the word long before the devastating event in Las Vegas and to link them to the event in Las Vegas is down right WRONG! In any event, best wishes to you both.

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      • Dear Audrey, I have always said that if I played the tour now, I would not listen to golf commentary. If one believes the hype they become arrogant, if one believes the criticism they become angry. At the very least one is distracted. Having had your husband’s job for 20 years, I underatnd the nature of his work, and how important it is to not be distracted. My job now demands that I answer questions, constantly. To make judgments and predictions. To do that correctly takes time. So I spend my days looking at old video, swings, stats and I read media transcripts to get a sense of the mental make up of players. So that I can give the kind of answer that people deserve. So that I can tell them what they should expect. So that I can be accurate. And then I try to choose my words carefully. Words matter. They should be accurate and they should resonate. You once again have misquoted me. You said, that I said “why even show up”. I can assure you I did not say any such thing. As an athlete I know what’s it’s like to show up as an underdog and strive to overcome the odds. There is great purpose there. Besides the obvious glory of playing for their respective teams, everyone in the Presidents Cup had a great purpose. To win. My job was to predict who would win and tell the audience why. In a show leading up to the Presidents Cup I was asked that very question and I said, ” If this were a fight, they wouldn’t stop it, they would never let it start” I chose those words because the US was playing at home (- a 5 point advantage) and because they collectively had an average putting rank of 53, whereas the Internationals had an average rank of 103. I figured based upon these two and many other contributory things that it would be a blowout win for the US. So, how do I convey that? To say it will be a blwout win, I didn’t think would resonate, I want to use words that would resonate and since these team events take on a combative nature I thought about fights and decided on a play on words, and changed up an oft use cliche. Was it kind? It was kind to the winning team, quite kind and unkind to the losing team, that is the nature of commentary. Was it good? I’d argue it was accurate and that is what every commentator aims for. So yes, it was good commentary. Was it necessary? I suppose not. I could have said, I think the US will win, but then everyone was saying that, people watch our show to hear deeper analysis and that’s what I felt was necessary. Did it improve the silence? Well, I am on a talk show, and since people don’t tune in for silence, I’d have to say yes, it did, but some could easily argue the opposite, as you have. The world of media is funny, and as you are now writing this blog, you have dipped a toe into the media waters, it is funny because it is entirely subjective. One person may love you and another may hate you. It is quite a bit different than golf, which is beautiful for its objectivity; no one can say you’re bad if you shoot 65. TV being so different, (and by the way my kids also see and hear negative things written and said about me and I’d like to think I’m their hero too, and that in seeing me deal gracefully with the insults they learn patience) I knew I had to come up with my own criteria for success. That being, did I do the work necessary to know what I needed to know and did I give my audience what they needed to know? If the answer is yes, then I can sleep. If not then I work harder. Beyond that, people compliment and criticize me all the time in my work, but I believe that one should be able to hear both compliments and criticisms and be unaffected by either. Because if you believe the hype you become arrogant and if you believe the criticism you become angry. I’m not arrogant and I’m not angry, but I would ask that you understand a few things about my job before you criticize what I do. First, it is a little like golf, in that sometimes we make mistakes too. Second, the money in golf comes from high exposure and mostly that exposure is laudable, as those winning are the ones on TV, but sometimes it is critical as it necessarily must be, someone wins, someone loses. Before lashing out about the crticism, remember that we have right at a thousand people at The Golf Channel who work tirelessly to tell the stories of the tour pros and their families in a positive light. I am one of them, and you need only look at the Fedexcup event your husband won to find me going on and on about Marc’s considerable talents. All the best to you and yours. Brandel Chamblee

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    • Well done Audrey. There is no excuse for poor sportsmanship or rude comments. I am a big fan of Marc’s and root for him wherever he is playing. Hoping 2018 is a continuation of good play and hoping for a Masters win.

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  2. I salute you Audrey Leishman, and agree with all that you said. I too watched and heard with dismay, the boorish ill-mannered shouting from the crowd ! Is this what golf has become in America ? If it is, I am glad that I will never visit there again.! The true sportsmanship of the International team was a beacon of light in a very dark land. Nick Price and his team can hold their heads high as they conceded defeat in a way in which the ugly Americans could not match, even in victory ! I always believed that golf was the last remaining bastion of true sportsmanship, but the American spectators, and some ( but not all of the players) dispelled that dream. Hold true to your standards, Marc and Audrey, you have both come so far, with strength, humilty and sportsmanship. No one can ever take that away from you. Congratulations. Steve Povey, Australia

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    • Steve Povey, let me share something with you. On 9/11 my brother in law (who’s an Aussie) was on the phone with my brother as tower 2 came down. He thought it was funny. “Your second tower is down, mate” he said with a chuckle. He later apologized — as he should have. I suppose I could hold this against all of you Bogans, and I suppose I could surmise that delight in Americans dying by the thousands was shared by millions of Aussies. Truth is, I really don’t know, although I suspect the worst. In any case, you people do not hold the high moral ground in any way shape or form. Not with your history of racism and genocide. Cheers from ‘Murica.

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    • Why is it that when I tune into the European tour or the Asian Tour that I don’t hear these kind of negative comments while the players are teeing off? Why do Americans abuse the word freedom?

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  3. Excellent. Couldn’t agree more. I wasn’t there but it has often struck me that both the Ryder Cup and President’s Cup seems to bring out an entirely different beast – player and fan (both in the minority – granted). Golf can do without cat calls and general disrespect for opponents. I don’t find what I would call aggressive “celebrations” by players after holing a bunker shot, etc particularly appealing, either. One of professional golf’s most endearing qualities is the respectful atmosphere in which it is usually played and the example that sets for young fans.

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  4. Thank you for having the courage to say what most of us think about the boorish behaviour of American golf fans. I love the competition of what the President and Ryder Cups brings to the game but find the over-the-top behaviour by too many so called ‘fans’ an embarrassment which leaves a sour taste and a poor reflection on their country. Some players also need to be taken to task regarding how to conduct themselves when representing their respective countries. At the end of the day, it is only a game in the big scheme of things. I guess this wasn’t as difficult to do compared to the battles you have had to endure in your own personal life. I wish you, Marc and family all the very best for the future. He is a cool dude and even when he doesn’t win, he always comes across as a winner in my book.

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    • People need to watch, “The Greatest Game Ever Played,” and emulate the quite politeness of that golf crowd who were every bit as pumped and enthusiastic as golf crowds today. Just one major difference; class!

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      • The book is a great read as well. Enthusiasm and passion is great from spectators and players but let’s not forget how to win with humility and to lose with grace. Berger’s comment regarding ‘crushing the opposition’ can be thought privately if that’s what it takes for him to win but crass and classless for him to state publicly. Disappointed to read some of the negative feedback – many have missed the point of Audry’s article completely and exposes their ignorance and lack of empathy. One amazing statistic that comes out of America is that 95% of Americans don’t have a passport and have never travelled out of their own country. Hence a real lack of understanding of how they are perceived outside their own country. Golf is a universal and unifying game – let’s keep it that way by showing respect both on and off the course.

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  5. Nice summary Ms Leishman, the behavior of the minority of fans is an annoyance for us spectators and an embarrassment if they are from your own country. But I cannot really imagine what it would be like for the players or their families. To me golf has always been a magical game where you can only play your best, be your best. You cannot influence your opponents. Cannot hit a return ball back a bit harder, or run a bit faster, or out-fox them with a cunning tactical move. You play your best on the day and hope it is good enough. Play the game of your life, someone plays better and they win. Congratulate them and work out how to be better next week, Not work out how to beat them.
    It’s easy to tar the US fans because of the culture of competitiveness and patriotism. I’m not and I know you are not. But it is disappointing behavior that is spreading, unintentionally supported by media coverage. And worrying that this feeling is also showing up in the players and crowds in junior competition.
    Thank you for your observations and wish you, the family and that magnificent golfer of yours all the best.

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  6. Thank you for this heartfelt, well written, intelligent blog. As a British golf fan I deplore the behaviour of fans watching the USA team. Stop the alcohol & encourage the crowd to ‘self police’ is surely the answer.

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  7. Congratulations for telling it the way it was. From my observations there was one team of respected golf fans and the others who should be ashamed of their behaviour. I am an Aussie and proud to see the Leishman success. He and you are winners as far as zi am concerned.
    I have followed Marc at Royal Pines on the Gold Coast and he is a true ambassador for both golf and Australia.

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  8. Hi Audrey, I appreciate your comments. I found golf very hard to watch over the weekend for this very reason . We play and love golf . We love watching golf on The Golf Channels . We absolutely love watching our very Own Australian Players. Life is short, life is tough but lets show love, compassion and enjoyment in winning and loosing . We are so proud to watch Marc play and wish you and your family love and happiness . Tim and Lindsay

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  9. A great article, is it any wonder the rest of the world doesn’t like America when there are Americans who behave like this. It’s up to the majority of well mannered, well behaved Americans to pull these loudmouths into line.
    Well done USA on your domination of the Presidents Cup, now change the rules so that the International team can select a true International team.

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  10. Marc and Matty stayed in our home in Midland TX when he won the tournament there by 11 strokes in some really bad West TX wind!! They were perfect house guests and we wished they could have stayed longer.
    From then on, we have cheered for our favorite golfer, as rookie of the year on the PGA tour and all his tournaments win or lose. We cheer for him in life. We cheer for him, the man, the husband, father, son and friend that he is. The world is a better place with Marc in it. Best wishes for all your days!!!

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  11. The only time the International teams complain is when they lose. 1999 Ryder Cup – Whined about the US celebrating Leonard’s putt. 2008 Ryder Cup complained about Boo Weekly and the fans. The last Ryder Cup the fans again. Now this shit. Every single week of the year you play a game where everything you do is cheered. Everyone claps for you no matter what you do. It’s not like that in any other sport. I don’t understand why you can’t grow a set of balls for one week and just deal with it. Use it to fuel you the way Rory and Sergio do. Also, lets not make this an American thing. European countries and other countries have some of the worst fans in the world. Chanting racist things at Soccer games and rioting etc. So shut up with the American bullshit. You got your ass kicked. deal with it, use it to get better and come back in 2 years and make us pay for it. That is what sports is about.

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    • My goodness. The utter boorishness of this comment very perfectly represents the asinine behavior referred to in Mrs Leishman’s post, and is written by someone who clearly has no clue of the values that have been ingrained deeply in the game of golf from its beginnings. How shameful.

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      • Matt, you are such a pussy. These are grown men and women whining about the fans. “Oh the big bad Americans were so mean to us Whaa” Ever been in a football stadium were the road team is putting a beating on the home team? You can hear a pin drop. You want to shut up the fans? Try not getting your doors blown off. Grow up.

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      • Joe…simply, rooting for your team, ‘banging’ on the opposition is one thing…but it can get waaaaaaay out of hand..and if what Mrs. Leishman describes crosses the line..

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    • Haha. Love it. Well said Joe. Remember when the brits won the Ryder cup recently and rubbed it in our faces so hard?!
      Dont like Americans then stay out. How dare you come to another country and criticize the people that are paying your husband to make money playing a game.

      For all of you that support Audrey that weren’t at the event should stfu or maybe go next time to show how proper you are. Givery me a break.

      What does she mean “come together”? You are Australian and dont give a rats $!# about USA except for using us to get rich.

      Bye bye

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      • I agree with you on all the chanting and terrible remarks at these golf tournaments!! My husband and I use to attend the Players championship every years here in Florida. Well, we stopped going, after a couple of years ago the “young people” in the crowds were down right “drunk”. They were obnoxious, yelling, swearing and NOT golf fans!!!
        I think the drinking at these golf events should be curtailed, it is NOT a party. Why let these “fools” ruin it for real golf fans!!!!

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    • Joe: you wrote: The only time the International teams complain is when they lose. 1999 Ryder Cup – Whined about the US celebrating Leonard’s putt….NO they were trying to tell us..YOU celebrated Leonard’s put all over the green and prevented his opponent [I think] Jose Maria O….from making his putt for some time and it was out of line…but the joy was evident….look at the video..totally understandable..but it destroyed any chance for him to make his after Leonard.

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  12. Thank you for sharing your story and observations, Mrs. Leishman. Does it surprise me? This boorish behavior? Not one bit. There is no respect. Sportsmanship…gone. Your husband is a great player. He has the game to back his play and like you said, how he handles himself with grace whether he wins or loses…it’s honorable. Wishing you and your family health and happiness!

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  13. I respect Mrs. Leishman and her opinions. Her husband is a great golfer and seems like a good dude. BUT, whenever there’s a winner and loser, most often the loser comes up with excuses or complaints. The US team enjoyed their victory. Berger was confident and spoke the truth. Why’s he being vilified? Ian Poulter is one of THE worst mannered team event players according to your standards. I personally think he’s a great competitor and respect his abilities, but if you’re going to sling arrows make sure you hit the target. Was the crowd rowdy? Yes. Are foreign crowds rowdy when played on their soil? Yes. I’d even say worse than the US fans. I personally don’t have a problem with the excitement. Personal jabs a out girlfriends and such are not acceptable but unfortunately it happens. Or just in the US. You complain about drinking starting at 7? Have you been to England or Ireland? They enjoy a few brews as well now don’t they?

    I saw your interview a couple weeks ago and thing you’re a thoughtful and smart woman supporting a great cause. I just think you should think your comments through before you plaster them all over social networking. Some US players are better friends with some of the Euros and visa versa. Unfortunately, in today’s liberal, easily offended, thinskinned world we live in situations such as this occur.

    Your husbands a beast on the Golf course. I look forward to seeing him win more tournaments! By the way, not that this matters, but I’m American obviously and my favorite player is Jason Day. Cheers!

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      • So boorish behavior from one side justifies boorish behavior from another? I’m an American through and through but I was embarrassed by the behavior that Mrs. Leishman references. Her desire for her husband (that he win with humility and lose with grace) should be the same desire for us as fans.

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    • Whataboutism, based on purported behavior by *European* teams and fans. Fair warning, this wasn’t the Ryder Cup and that wasn’t the European team competing and subjected to the boorish behavior of the crowd.

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    • Yes, the Europeans might drink their beer early in the day, but, they know how to moderate it and not be rude. No wonder your favorite player is Day.

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    • I am Irish and this stereotype that we are all raving alcoholics is pathetic. Pubs can only start selling alcohol after 10am and why would you want to start drinking at 7am in the morning

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  14. Great article. I am British living in the US and a huge golf fan. At normal tour events what has struck me is the courtesy and support shown to all players regardless of nationality and it is therefore extremely disappointing and shocking to see the rude and shamefully ignorant behaviour of ‘fans’ at the Presidents and Ryder cups. By all means support your team but in a positive and respectful manner. The behaviour of some of the US team needs addressing too. The words of Daniel Berger do not belong in golf and I hope he is ashamed of himself and that this is addressed in the team room. Disgusting. Jordan Speith by contrast is an example to his team and shows courtesy to his opponents.

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  15. You’re right…with regards to the international team, you probably can’t find a nicer group of guys…But you can find a better group of golfers! LOL

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  16. Audrey, you are grace personified, and Marc is one of the most exceptional people I’ve ever met – on or off TOUR. I’m sorry this team of champions and their family and friends had to experience such wretched behavior from the crowds at Liberty National. I’m embarrassed by a lot about our country these days. This? At a friendly sporting exhibition? Beyond outrageous. I, like your parents, turned it off. I’m truly insured by your strength, dignity and perspective. My best to you all.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. 63 citizens killed, 483 injured in Las Vegas by a gun nut and at least half the country or more could care less because they won’t give up their guns or have a discussion about guns, including the President.
    You really think your going to get well behaved people at a Golf tournament, when were a country of no manners, could care less about how someone feels about us and shout people down if we disagree with them ?
    I live here in the USA, we’ve become. Ill mannered, uncouth, uncivilized and rude.
    If your looking for your answer of why we’re this way, just look at what was elected President.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Wow, I bet you are a strong liberal!!! LOL!!!!!!! Listen, guns have never and never will kill anyone …. people do!!!! If that mad man in Vegas had not had a gun he would have used a bomb or a car and probably killed more. The problem is the liberal and politically correct cancer in our society ….. fix that and this country will be back to its senses!

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    • LaBeets,

      Please tell me how many golf tournaments you have attended, I could be wrong but I bet not many. Because if you have been to golf tournaments, you wouldn’t condemn all golf fans with a sweeping stroke of the brush.

      Why do some people always have to drag politics into EVERYTHING??? The Las Vegas shooting was a terrible tragedy of the first magnitude, but that isn’t the topic here, nor is gun control, nor is it someone complaining about Trump being elected. Your comments are more suited for a political blog, please take them there, and leave this one to people who wish to comment on the subject matter, which is golf and golf fans.

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    • What does the Las Vegas tragedy have to do with Mrs. Leishman’s post about the American fans behavior at the golf tournament. I suppose you troll all kinds of discussion groups and twist your “gun rights “ into the discussion. Maybe you need to gat off this discussion and go protest the legitimacy of the president since he stole the election because of Russia, electoral college, James Comey, etc

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  18. I never watch the President’s cup, or the Ryder Cup when it is played in America. The crowds are nasty and malicious – and I get so angry. This tirade of hate for the opposing team must and should be stopped by the PGA. You can’t ask the crowds to police them, it will just cause more dissension by drunken boors.

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  19. The ignorant people that disrespect anyone for any reason are all over this world! Not just in America! I’m sure if you talked to American golfers who have played in the Ryder Cup or the Presidents Cup outside the U.S. they have had the same done to them. Just ask Hunter Mahan. I do not condone what happened at the event. You cannot just blame America. You have to blame the rest of the world involved also. As an American you should know this, we get mistreated all over the world,but we still help anyone that needs it. You cannot blame one without blaming all! And the Cup was created for nations that don’t play the Ryder Cup.

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  20. You hit the nail on the head! I always enjoy watching golf, especially these biennial events, but the last 2 held (Solheim and Presidents Cup) were just too distasteful. The Americans (players and audience) just DO NOT HAVE HUMILITY, both in winning and losing. One can not control the behavior of a person or persons in the crowd, but the players do not have to egg them on for the crowd to think that what they are doing is right. Having fun is okay, but being mean is not. For some, winning or losing graciously is something they’ve never heard of.

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    • Yes, I agree, the crowds at the last two PGA events I attended were nothing but drunken kids, yelling screaming and displaying a complete lack of respect for themselves, the fans and the players. The horrible part was there were law enforcement and PGA security akoimbo, but doing nothing, I mean nothing. I wrote the PGA about this a year ago, with not response…and it continues….the cat is out of the bag and guess what, it will take some serious action to bring the fans back to social manners.

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  21. I’m 60 years old. So my dinosaur opinion doesn’t mean much these days. But I really disappointed in many of the changes in our “Modern American Culture”. The word gentleman is hardly even understood anymore. Certainly not valued. And to be honest, “drinking at 7 AM” is all I have to know to guess the rest of the story.

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  22. I attended my first PGA event in 1975, at the time it was the Danny Thomas St. Jude Classic. The crowds were unbelievably courteous. Each putt, every tee shot, every fairway iron or sand shot was met with deafening silence. Polite applause greeted good shots. Murmurs followed poor shots or putts. Occasionally cheers would erupt for spectacular approaches or eagle putts made. Even during the pro-am, crowds were appreciative.

    Not today. “You da man” or “In da hole” is a given on any shot anywhere on the course. Players are routinely booed for their performance or their political affiliation. I’ve been to the Masters three times, 2 US Open’s, dozens of PGA events and the PGA Championship. Every year the crowds become increasingly rude, not just to the players, but to other event goers. All the while the supposed managers of the game, the PGA and USGA, do nothing to curb the ongoing chaos. Attending a tournament just isn’t fun anymore. The crudity of tournament patrons carries over to the local golf venues. I’ve seen it all. Players drive carts onto greens and tee boxes. Huge divots taken in greens for a missed putt. Bunkers remain unraked. Players hitting into the group in front of them to “speed them up.” “Cart path only” and “Carts to the path” must be written in Arabic since no one seems to know what they mean. Six-somes playing together and taking six hours to play are ignored. Players re-teeing at will. Carts left in the parking lot after unloading clubs. Beer cans tossed into creeks and ponds. Players dancing across greens. Not only is going to a tournament no fun, but even a relaxing day on the course has become a day of bad Pro-wrestling.

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  23. Sadly, I have to agree with you. Like you, as an American I’m embarrassed at these moronic, booze fueled, juvenile outbursts that seem to be permeating the sport I love more and more. Until they start tossing some of these people out on their ass, stop serving booze all day (yeah, right…ABInbev would be up in arms) and implement some sort of Code of Conduct like Augusta has in place you can count on seeing more of this crap. By the way, a word to the wayward fan; You…yelling “You da man!!”…you’re not the man. Thanks for saying what needed to be said and my apologies for the pathetic few clowns who apparently are in dire need of attention. My best to you and the Internationals.

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  24. you need to get a grip!! The event is a sporting competition and as such both teams should desire to beat the other completely and totally… period! So Berger’s comments were spot on!! Don’t be a spoiled sport!! Your husband is a truly great player and seems to be a really nice guy but your comments here are pure spoiled sport material! These comments never come after an international win only after they get beaten. Sorry but true!

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  25. What a brilliant article Audrey. You did miss a few things in your things they miss. Carlton Draught, Pavs, Chico Rolls, hamburgers with the lot including beetroot.

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  26. “Captain Price got our attention and asked us to start clapping for the American Team. Because that is what golf is. That is what sportsmanship is. That is why I was so proud to be part of the International Team.”
    You are so proud of what? Captain Price had to get your attention and ask you to start clapping. If it was true sportsmanship, you would have already been clapping.

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  27. Audrey, so sorry that the fans mistreated you & your team. I have been a volunteer (walking scorer) at many tournaments at Doral & have always noted the extreme care that particularly foreign-born players show us. They are typically very courteous & appreciative. For someone especially like you, a woman who has overcome such a terrible disease, to feel hurt is very bothering to me. Marc is an excellent man & neither of you deserve bad treatment. But please keep in mind that the large majority are more like me & there are always a few bad apples. As you certainly know, beating a fierce competitor pales in comparison to beating a disease! My best wishes to you always.

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  28. Audrey raises some excellent points, the truth of the matter is that the behavior of golf ‘fans’ at the team events is not representative of golf fans in general at ‘regular’ events, both in the USA and elsewhere. But in the interest of fairness, it should be pointed out that the problem fans are a very small percentage of the total, and the American team usually endures the same rude behavior when they play the Ryder Cup on foreign soil. Of course that still doesn’t make it OK for anyone to behave poorly. Other posts have pointed out the decline of manners and politeness in American society, and that part is sadly true. I will take a lot of heat for this since I am not from the northeast, but an inherent part of the problem was that the event was held near New York City, which is home to people who in general are more rude and insulting than any other part of the country. I know this to be true because I have traveled extensively to virtually the entire U.S. and to many foreign countries. New Yorkers think they are ‘colorful’, and ‘tell it like it is’, but they are just obnoxious. I’m pretty confident the problems would have been much less virtually any place else. Finally, the people acting poorly aren’t true golf fans, because they don’t get it, they don’t understand that golf is indeed a gentleman’s game, with a long standing code of behavior, incumbent on the principle that you play within the rules trying your best to defeat your opponent, but shake hands at the end of the day and say ‘well played’, regardless of outcome.

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  29. My brother and I and some friends were there Sat. the 30th, all day. We witnessed several unsportsmanlike acts by our American brethren, including rooting for int. balls to go in the water or hazards, putts to go way past the hole, cheering missed putts or poor shots, even yelling during a players backswing once. We did shout them down several times with “respect the game” but it did little to curb their boorish behaviour. While the great majority of American golf fans are respectful and knowledgeable, there seems to be a growing number of these guys who don’t understand the traditional sportsmanship of this great game. They think they are at Giants or Yankee games I guess, but Golf is different. We were brought up to play your best in any sport, but win or lose, be gracious. As true Golf fans we appreciate a well executed shot whether it is struck by an American or one of our opponents. Respect the Game!! PS We still had a great time in a beautiful setting! Thank you!

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  30. There is no doubt some of the new breed of American player is a little more boisterous then the guys in the 30’s and older. But is certain not fair by any stretch to include the behavior of a few, less than 1 percent and call out the entire crowd. 99% of the fans that went to the Presidents Cup wanted to see
    some great golf. Every player on the International Team has fans in this country that care about where they came from, how the play, what kind of people they are. Letting a few idiots giving the rest of us a black eye does’ sit well. No body can speak for Daniel Berger but Daniel Berger. He’ll have to answer for his stupidity for a long time. The organizers know what they were going to get going NYC. Have you ever been to a Yankees game as a fan of the visiting team?? Do that once. Golf is a game of traditions and etiquette. It is sad for those that don’t understand that. Nothing but the best to you and Marc!! Please don’t let these knuckleheads get to you.

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  31. The “fans” referred to in this post by Marc Lieshman’s wife do NOT reflect the true spirit of golf in the US. We can be passionate for our team without being so ignorant. Why do some so called sports fans have to go overboard. As a former New Yorker and a fan of the integrity of golf I apologize to Mrs Leishman and the International Team and their families and fans for a few dopes that cannot conduct themselves in the spirit of the game of golf.

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  32. I actually turned the golf off !!! And l never do that . Even in the history of golf etiquette was a major part of the game . Disappointed . Even last year wasn’t much better . This I will mention !!! And this was a player. When a player goes out of his way to make shore another player doesn’t do it by the book that’s not sportsmanship . Think Rory mcilroy was pisses but handed it very well . Nice one Phil .

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  33. Haha. Love it. Well said Joe. Remember when the brits won the Ryder cup recently and rubbed it in our faces so hard?!
    Dont like Americans then stay out. How dare you come to another country and criticize the people that are paying your husband to make money playing a game.

    For all of you that support Audrey that weren’t at the event should stfu or maybe go next time to show how proper you are. Givery me a break.

    What does she mean “come together”? You are Australian and dont give a rats $!# about USA except for using us to get rich.

    Bye bye

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  34. Audrey! This post is everything. I am a long-time PGA volunteer from Columbus, Ohio. I was fortunate to be assigned to player movement in the 2013 Presidents Cup and spent most of my time with the International guys and their families. It was an incredibly memorable week and I was so appreciative of the kindness and personality the guys and their families showed me, a lowly volunteer ;).

    I’m glad you’ve expressed your thoughts from Liberty National, as I, too, felt…different there. Let me assure you – MOST of those in the spectator stands were not PGA fans. Golf, as a sport, isn’t something New Yorkers are familiar with (for obvious reasons – taking golf clubs on the train to get to a course a 45 minute commute away and then paying a ton of money to play a crappy course – no thanks). However, if there is an excuse to be outside and drinking early in the morning, that’s what New Yorkers love. I met a lot of spectators who literally had no idea what the word par meant.

    On another note, am a big fan of your husband’s. With Jason & Ellie here in Columbus, I pay much more attention to the Aussies now. I appreciate the class and spirit Marc brings to the game and hope to see you both at the Memorial Tournament in May!

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  35. Most of the screaming, yelling cursing patrons are generally not golf fans but generally idiots out looking for any party that will let them in for a buck. Don’t let their stupidity both you. As far as the analysis and team player celebrations and ribbings I would say that you either ignore it or get used to it because it happens whereever this event occurs. I hate to toss another burden on Tiger Woods but along with the great expansion and compensation that came along with his stellar play and dominance, the sport also acquired more than the usual amount of idiots.

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  36. I tend to agree with the writer’s assessment of the American fans inappropriate behavior after misplays of the International team. In golf, there has always been a mutual respect between opponents; however, I have witnessed an erosion of this regarding the Ryder and President Cup competitions in the last several years. It results as an embarrassment in the face of good sportsmanship on our behalf.

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  37. I am a fan of Mark and his outstanding success is great. Unfortunately there are some bad apples and as a famous athlete, the athlete and family of, sometimes have to deal with poor behavior of spectators. Go to the Ryder Cup in France next year to witness some real nasty stuff. (President’s cup really doesn’t compare as it’s not much of a competition, no offense)
    It’s unfortunate people act like that but you need thicker skin. The more success Mark has, the more the ‘haters’ come out. It’s not right, but it is reality. Ask others in your situation.
    It may suck, but the alternative is Mark not making the President’s Cup Team, not playing amazing golf, and being a no name who will not get criticized.
    I NEVER take the time to comment on any article, post, etc, and not sure why I did here. Call Sergio and ask him about heckling. Focus on your husbands wonderful season and not the fans of one event.

    Like

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